Sometimes you just have to do something different

My goal yesterday morning was to crochet a small flower embellishment for a wee tunic I had knitted.

I have to confess to putting this seemingly small task off for a number of months now.

But the garment needs to be completed and with the weather looking cloudy and windy I gathered the resources I needed.

My skills with a crochet hook are pretty minimal but the pattern told me “easy”, “simple to make”, “basic” and so I told myself I could do this.

Hmmm 2 hours later my fingers and thumbs were in a muddle, the number of “undoings” was mounting, as was my frustration level.

Right I thought I’ve given this a good go, I’ll go and do something completely different and come back to the crochet later.

The garden work eased my frustration and allowed my brain circuits to focus on weeds but to keep processing what I’d learnt in the morning.

Once back to my crochet project my good old brain suggested I try something new with the crochet hook and suddenly I could see progress and something appearing in my hands that resembled the picture in the pattern. I perservered, reread the instructions, tweaked my approach and voila I had done it!

It really does pay to change pace, environment or activity when things don’t go well or the ideas dry up. All the while trusting that our clever brains are still working on the problem. Then return to the task with freshness and (hopefully) success.

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Sometimes you just have to do something different

  1. Marian

    Lovely blog post – so easy to relate to – it’s a simple idea that we often overlook in the push to ‘get through the job’. Coming back to a task with a clear head and a fresh eye can make all the difference.

    Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      Thanks Marian. Our brains are great but they sometimes need time to process, collate, reconfigure, make new connections etc. It seems that doing something different, especially work that does not require using the same parts of the brain can see great results when we return to the gritty stuff.

      Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      Thanks Juliet. I thought your flax weaving looked very festive. I would need to take some rest at times learning to weave flax.

      Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      They certainly are amazing mechanisms Ruth. I often return to a crossword and see the answers that earlier had eluded me…

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Two small flowers « ordinarygoodness

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s