Monthly Archives: February 2012

Wednesday quote from Margaret Cousins

Appreciation can make a day, even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary..
Margaret Cousins
Reblogged from: http://lakesidelane.wordpress.com. With thanks Dianne 🙂

Industrious neighbours

I live next to two very industrious neighbours. Both men are semi-retired and are skilful with hammers (except they use nail guns nowadays) and constructing things.

Just in the past two weeks one has reclad the lower section of his two-storey house where old timber was rotting and the other has erected a glass house (except nowadays plastic is used in lieu of glass) and built a made to measure garden shed.

Both men installed windows which looks to be tricky work and both worked from early morning until late afternoon in order to complete their projects.

Life is not a competition so I have stood by and admired their skills and the results of their hard work. But I thought I would show you some of the ways in which I have been industrious these past few weeks.

I have made 6 full length aprons – two were “man aprons” and four were for women. I also made a pre-school sized apron for our grandson so that he would match Daddy and be able to wear his apron when he helps Daddy cook.

Woman's full length apron

Woman’s full length apron

I’ve made a strong tote to carry our singing folders in and I am busy making some light- weight pyjamas for our grandson in an electric guitar print. He is crazy about music and his Daddy plays “big guitars”.

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On the knitting front I have been busy knitting these wee tunics for our new granddaughter and wrestling with crochet flower embellishments and I am also using yummy soft, non-prickly alpaca yarn to knit a hoodie for our grandson for the colder weather ahead.

Alpaca hoodie on the needles

Alpaca hoodie on the needles

I suspect there has been productive hum emanating from our little patch on the earth

Hieroglyphics at home

Yesterday I heard strange beeping noises, followed closely by the sound of a spray can. Now normally my neighbourhood is pretty quiet at 9.30am on a Friday and we are fortunate that spray cans are not widely used for graffiti purposes.

However hieroglyphic graffiti had appeared on the grass, the footpath and the road. There was an official looking chap wielding the spray can and sporting high viz safety gear (I’m not sure why he needed a hard hat because the only thing that could fall on him was the sky!).

Being a “concerned citizen” and having had problems with people digging up the ground and disrupting our water supply in the past because of its unlikely location, I headed out to quiz this chap.

It seems that we are to have fibre optic cables laid outside our property as part of the nationwide high speed fibre optic initiative and he was there with his special gizmo to establish the whereabouts of the underground electricity cables. When the gizmo located its target it would emit beeping noises and the chap would mark out his findings.

So here are the patterns near my house. I wonder if there will be more such hieroglyphics added soon as other gizmos search out and locate sewage pipes, waste water, water supply, telephone, gas and long redundant cable television connections. There is lot going on underground here and adding yet another cable sounds pretty tricky.
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Stunning weather, stunning visitor

Today has been a hot, sunny day. The sort of February day we expect. Sadly such days have been few and far between since Christmas time 2011.

At lunch time I heard the prettiest song and as I looked out into our back garden I saw a grey- fawn coloured bird darting amongst the leaves of the golden elm tree.
It was bigger than a sparrow but smaller than a blackbird and it sang with such clear, bell-like sounds interspersed with more ordinary chirrups.

It was gone before I could look for the camera and I doubt that I would have managed to capture it without a zoom lens and more technique than I have.

I checked my NZ birds book and was delighted to find that I had seen a New Zealand Bellbird, or Korimako, its Maori name. It was Mrs Bellbird. I had heard her song a couple of times in the previous weeks but I could not see the singer.

I am so thrilled that I have finally seen a Bellbird in the wild and even more thrilled that the bird was in my garden. I hope Mrs Bellbird returns soon and brings Mr Bellbird with her.

A cicada ladder?

The noisy songs of the cicada are a familiar feature of New Zealand summers. But this summer the grey clouds have quietened the usual noise and there have only been spasmodic days when I’ve heard their welcome sounds.

I was trimming back some foliage in our garden on Sunday and came across this branch containing the shed skins of at least 5 cicadas (the 5th is just out of this shot). It looked like a cicada ladder.

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Rose quote from Dale Carnegie

My friend and colleague Marian over at Contemplate Life Coaching offered me this great rose quote after I posted my Wedding Rose photo and quote this morning.

I like it so much that I have reposted it as a separate post for you all to enjoy.

“One of the most tragic things I know about human nature is that all of us tend to put off living. We are all dreaming of some magical rose garden over the horizon-instead of enjoying the roses blooming outside our windows today.” Dale Carnegie

The Wedding Rose blooms in our garden

We had a wedding at Xmas time 2011 and my husband (father of the groom) received a rose for his Xmas present from the newly weds. The rose is called “The Wedding rose”.

It has put its roots down into the garden and is responding to water, feeding and mulching by putting out new blooms.

I took my camera out in the dusky light last evening and captured this lovely bloom.

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I went looking today for a quote about roses and really enjoyed the cleverness of this quote. It also seemed appropriate for a rose that commemorates weddings.

“Won’t you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you.”
Richard Brinsley Sheridan