Monthly Archives: April 2012

Flowering cherry trees in their autumn tonings

Some years ago now a wonderful decision was made by our local city council. In recognition of Porirua’s Sister City relationship with Nishio City in Japan, a grove of flowering cherry trees was planted on grassy reserve land near our local school and kindergarten.

2012_0430Image0107 (960x1280)

This grove of trees brings such simple but profound pleasure to so many residents and visitors as the trees cycle through the seasons. Last spring the flowering was prolific and the lack of wind meant the blossoms were not ruined. In summer it is a shady, leafy spot for children to play or picnic under and for dogs to enjoy sniffing about on their daily walk.

Autumn brings a dramatic colour show with the trees now large and spreading. We have been enjoying, actually reveling in an Indian summer since Easter and the nights have not been crisp and cold in the main. This has meant the leaves on these trees have not had the stimulation that causes strong colour changes. However nature is at work right now despite our “false” summer and the trees are well worth visiting to enjoy their autumn splendour.

2012_0430Image0109 (1280x960)
With storm force winds predicted for yesterday and through the night we decided to head down to the grove to capture some photos before the leaves were stripped off by the gales.

2012_0430Image0113 (1280x960)
The wind proved to be very “Wellington”. So strong I had trouble opening my car door against it and to walk into the wind required a certain lean that all Wellingtonians get teased about. It was nevertheless invigorating as swirls of fallen leaves from the many deciduous trees in that spot flew up and around us.

Such a large expanse of varied colour was a challenge to capture on humble digital cameras from ground level but we did our best.

2012_0430Image0114 (1280x960)
2012_0430Image0110 (1280x960)

After being buffeted and blown about we returned home feeling utterly refreshed and “our cobwebs” blown away.

Advertisements

Acorns and fairies

We took our cameras down to the grove of Flowering Cherry trees (here they are in glorious spring last year) which is near our local Kindergarten and Primary School.

Near the school car park are three large Oak trees. My children all attended this school and at this time of the year they would bring home piles of acorns, collected in sweatshirt pockets, empty lunch boxes or in their school packs.

2012_0430Image0120 (1280x960)

Today the ground was littered with acorns and the little cups that drop off the acorn. The little cups are the fascinating means that allow the acorn to form and hold it on the tree until the seed is ripe enough to tumble to the ground.

2012_0430Image0122 (1280x960)
Did you play with acorns and the little cups when you were a child? I did, pretending the little cups could be drink containers for fairies or tiny hats for tiny heads?

2012_0430Image0126 (1280x960)

And do you remember this rhyme about Oak trees and acorns? We used to chant this at each other during acorn seasons long ago.

“Don’t worry if your job is small and your rewards are few,
Remember that the mighty oak was once a nut like you”….

I’ll post some photos of the flowering cherry trees in their autumn colours in my next post…..:-)

Jam and medicine

Earlier in the week I visited the nearby wetlands, wildlife area in Pauatahanui. I took my trusty “point and shoot” camera with the intention of taking some photos for possible entries in next year’s Guardians of Pauatahanui Inlet photo competition. (Do have a look at the winning photos in this year’s competition, there are some utterly stunning shots. I particularly love the ones of the herons)

As we ambled along a track I spied a native Poroporo bush (Solanum laciniatum) and on it a single orange berry set amongst the deep green foliage.

2012_0430Image0095 (1280x960)

I know this plant and its gorgeous deep purple flowers and the fact that Maori used it traditionally as a contraceptive. I also know that the berries when green are poisonous and that the leaves are to be treated with caution too.

A little bit of searching around on the internet gave me further information. A member of the tomato family (Solanaceae) it is toxic to sheep and cattle so is no friend to farmers and their stock. It prefers to grow in the native bush or in rough, disturbed land.

I also learnt that the early European settlers made jam from the ripe berries.

This website provided further interesting information about the plant being studied to see whether it has medicinal properties which could be used in the treatment of arthritis and skin diseases.

The ordinary things in our environment can so often be valuable to us when we take the time to learn about them.

A day to reflect

It is ANZAC day here in New Zealand. A day when we remember the Australian and New Zealand troops who fought so heroically at Gallipoli. The day has been extended to remember all who have served in wars as Defence force members.

I know of 7 men in my family who served in WW1 and WW11. Fortunately all returned home but the cost was very high for some and the experience profound on them all.

I have spent some quiet time today reflecting on them and their bravery and courage.

My daughter and I spent some time this afternoon in our local wetlands, wildlife area at the head of the Pauatahanui Inlet. It was a peaceful place to reflect and remember all who served.

2012_0426Image0084 (1280x960)

Seasonal confusion?

I went about my garden yesterday and took some photos. What became obvious to me was that some plants were not yet going into late autumn mode thanks to the warm, dry weather we have been experiencing for a few weeks now.

I could only find one rose-hip where normally there are many by now and a small patio rose has put on new leaf and lo and behold has new flower buds.

2012_0424Image0106 (1280x960)

But the Smoke bush is in full autumn colour from yellow, to orange, to red, to deep crimson and its leaves are falling in the breezy conditions this week.

2012_0424Image0105 (1280x960)
And the Cotoneaster has its berries swelling and deepening into bright red. They are not ripe enough yet for the birds but I am watching for the feast to begin.
2012_0424Image0101 (1280x960)

Many of the deciduous trees look dry-leaved but are not turning their vibrant colours because our nights have not been cold and crisp yet.

And just to confuse things a little further the small kowhai bushes are busy flowering.
2012_0424Image0108 (1280x960)

A pastel sky at sunset

The sky painters went to their pastel palette last evening to paint a sunset in tones of baby blue and pink for us to gaze at.

2012_0424Image0097

In the fact the whole sky was encircled with colour. There was a soft, golden yellow off to the west but in other directions it was soft blues and pink tinged clouds.2012_0424Image0098

I noticed that within a minute or two of capturing these photos all the colours were completely gone.

Shakespeare by the Sea, Plimmerton

Earlier in the year I blogged about a local man, Russell Plume who had used old pieces of brick that he had found on Plimmerton beach and in the local stream to form quotations from Shakespeare. He has made settings of these quotes and several are mounted on sea walls at Plimmerton Beach.

Russell stumbled upon my blog during the week and left a welcome comment here.He has also set up a Facebook page called Shakespeare by the Sea, Plimmerton which includes photographic detail of how he constructed the pieces. He would welcome your interest.