Clocking the Cuckoos

New Zealand’s Forest and Bird organisation posted this information on their Facebook page today. I haven’t heard a shining cuckoo yet but when I do I will report to the spring migration research that is mentioned here:

Michael Anderson is postdoctoral fellow at Massey University who wants to know more about the arrival dates of the Long-tailed Cuckoo and Shining Cuckoo. These Cuckoos are NZ’s only forest birds that migrate out of the country. They breed in NZ, parasitizing endemic species, using them to raise their offspring for them. Little is known about their migration patterns, so Michael wants any info about the dates they arrive at each part of the country. Obviously we can’t ask customs. If you hear or see one of these birds, could you report it using one of these Google forms Long-tailed Cuckoo spring migration form
http://goo.gl/ClBMWZ and the Shining Cuckoo spring migration formhttp://goo.gl/CDjbuh. Check out these links for more info about our cuckoos http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/long-tailed-cuckoo, http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/shining-cuckoo) and some nice writing about the Shining Cuckoo from NZbirds http://www.nzbirds.com/birds/pipiwharauroa.html

3440-4 Long Tailed Cuckoo, Kapiti Island

Long tailed cuckoo photograph by Duncan Watson, sourced from http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz

For a little more information about the Shining Cuckoos’ relationship with the Grey Warbler go here.

470491Shining Cuckoo, Belmont

Shining Cuckoo photograph by Duncan Watson, sourced from http://nzbirdsonline.org.nz

If you are a New Zealand reader please clock in any cuckoos you see or hear so we can learn more about their unique habits.

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11 thoughts on “Clocking the Cuckoos

  1. Juliet

    I always listen for the cuckoos so it’s good to know where to send the information. Thanks Lynley, and I like the two beautiful photos as well. These birds are so hard to see and even harder to photograph.

    Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      The photos taken by Duncan Watson are very clear and attractive. I have yet to see either of these cuckoos but the song of the Shining Cuckoo is familiar to me. It is exciting to learn that someone is studying the patterns of these attractive birds and that you will record your observations Juliet.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: British cuckoo migration update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. Pingback: A Shining example | ordinarygoodness

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