Thursday Tui Triumph

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Finally I have set time aside to upload a video clip of Tuis visiting the sugar water feeders in my garden last November (2014).

It is my first You Tube upload and seemed simple enough thank goodness.

To get the best effect from the You Tube clip click this link here: , turn the sound up on your device and enjoy the songs of the Tui (they have a double voice box which means they can make a large range of fluting notes, through to gurgles and croaks). All the louder bird song/sounds on this clip are those of Tui.

I hope you can also hear the rustling sounds of their wings.

I have blogged about Tui many times here on my blog and they continue to bring me endless delight as they visit the garden.

During the next breeding season I will be on the look-out for visiting fledglings and I plan to video those charming youngsters.

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13 thoughts on “Thursday Tui Triumph

    1. ordinarygood Post author

      They are wonderful visitors to the garden and come in droves at times. At the moment they are flying between the feeders and a large flowering red gum a short distance away in a neighour’s backyard.

      Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      Aren’t they just the best! So territorial in some cases, sharing in others. The sound of those wings reminds me of women in period costume sweeping along hallways in taffeta and satins, rustling.
      I have been quite unwell with the flu that my husband had last week. I thought I had thrown it off but oh no! Your purchase is three quarters done. Sorry for the delay.

      Reply
  1. Juliet

    So fascinating to watch them, Lynley. I laughed at the big one that kept using the fence top as a position from which to intimidate the others, because it didn’t get much of a chance to feed itself. The smaller ones are very sleek and handsome.

    Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      I am constantly distracted by them Juliet! It is likely that the fence “sitter” is the self-appointed male of the territory!!! “He” sings his dominance too! I suspect the smaller ones are the females but it is hard to tell as size is the only clue to gender and some smaller Tui must be young males.

      Reply
  2. kiwiyarns

    You have something very special there! There are two elusive Tui that visit the trees around my house, but I never see them. I am amazed you manage to capture them so clearly in your photos – they move so fast! I see you have been unwell from other comments – get well soon – there is a nasty bug going around at the moment.

    Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      I just love having the Tui in the garden. My parents loved the Tui who sang in the apricot tree in the garden in our first house in Matarawa, Wairarapa so there is an extra connection to this bird for me. The feeders are very close to the house and I can slide the door open without disturbing them which helps make photos and videos. The three members of the household have all had a flu-like illness. I am on the improve now but my daughter is still feeling pretty miserable at times. As you say there are some nasty bugs around. I’m back knitting again so things are looking up:-) Thanks for your good wishes!

      Reply
  3. rthepotter

    What handsome birds they are – and I was amused by the rapier match going on between two of the birds near the end of your film. And congratulations on mastering the technology 🙂

    Reply
    1. ordinarygood Post author

      They can be very aggressive with each other. Territorial disputes are frequent. Their singing is divine so that is my next You Tube project now I have it all sussed.

      Reply

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