Tag Archives: Cabbage tree

Views from our two back doors

Celi over here has recently invited her sizeable readership to post photos of the view from their back porches or back doors.

We have two back doors, although one technically is a side door. It is the one that we use all the time to access the back part of the section.
This is a view from this door.

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The other door, the official back door, is very rarely used and looks out on to some pots and my collection of tubs in which I grow a few vegetables and a peep through some deck railings to our Golden Elm tree and Cabbage tree.
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Do go and look at the many and varied views that Celi has collated on her blog. It has proved to be a colourful challenge that many have met with their stunning photos.

Come for a walk around the native plants in my garden

It is a really miserable day here with a howling cold southerly blowing and showers sweeping over at regular intervals. Winter is showing its hand.

But on a beautiful, warm late autumn afternoon over the weekend I wandered about my garden to photograph examples of the native trees or plants I enjoy. Some of the specimens were planted by the previous owner of the house who was a passionate gardener. Some have been planted by us and even more have been the result of birds dropping seeds into the garden and the natives have taken root and flourished.

I have attempted to find the identifying names for the plants but please let me know if I have named one incorrectly.

I hope you enjoy the stroll too.

Taupata Coprosma Repens

Taupata
Coprosma Repens

Native hebe

Native hebe


Kowhai "Dragon's gold" Sophora microphylla

Kowhai “Dragon’s gold”
Sophora microphylla

Whiteywood.  Mahoe Melicytus ramiflorus

Whiteywood. Mahoe
Melicytus ramiflorus

Cabbage tree. Te Kouka. Cordyline Australis

Cabbage tree. Te Kouka.
Cordyline Australis

5 fingers.  Pseudopanax laetus

5 fingers. Pseudopanax laetus

5 fingers

5 fingers

Lancewood. Pseudopanax crassifolius

Lancewood. Pseudopanax crassifolius

Griselinia littoralis "variegata"

Griselinia littoralis “variegata”

Puka Puka.  Meryta sinclairii

Puka Puka. Meryta sincalairii

puka puka seeds

puka puka seeds

A walk to the Lookout

We had a perfect spring day here yesterday. It was sunny, warm and calm. We feel we deserve some really nice weather after weeks of grey, cloudy, very windy conditions.

After dinner last night we strolled up to the end of the street. We live on a cul-de-sac and at the top of the street there is a large grassy, tree lined reserve, signposted as The Lookout.

When it was first established the views would have been quite spectacular. But the Radiata pine trees, the gum trees, the Pohutukawas and other natives have grown towards the sky and good views are only glimpsed. Nevertheless it is a great spot in which to relax and enjoy nature.

The flaxes are flowering abundantly, offering our nectar loving birds more treats. The pollen is visible on these tubular flowers and we often see Tui with pollen on their heads and necks after they have feasted.

This magnificent Cabbage tree is flowering abundantly. Some say that means the summer will be a hot one. We have lived here long enough to know not to get too excited about such predictions…..but we do hope all the same.

Fellow blogger Ruth told me that the flowers of the Cabbage tree have a beautiful perfume and this tree was certainly filling the still air with the most delicate aroma. Our native wood pigeons love the flowers and seeds of this tree. This tree would be quite a venue for a wood pigeon gathering to eat their fill.

The light was beginning to fade as we left the Cabbage tree.

And the sun set as we neared home.