Tag Archives: daffodils

Down but not out

Two days of relentless gales had flattened my newly flowering daffodils.
DSCF2927 (1280x960)

I rescued what I could and bought the flowers inside to enjoy.
DSCF2929 (1280x960)

I see today that the remaining leaves and damaged flowers have almost returned to their previous height. Winter is very much with us still despite these early spring flowers showing a brave face to remind us of things yet to come.
DSCF2931 (1280x960)

The colours of spring

I saw the challenge to photograph the colours of spring on another blog yesterday.

So what are some of the colours of spring in my garden I wondered?

Here are a few as we enjoy a series of warmer, drier and sunnier days which are heralding the change to a new season.

The sweet delicacy of Camellia Quintessence

The sweet delicacy of Camellia Quintessence


Spraxia

Spraxia


Lobelia amongst the weeds in their spring green lushness

Lobelia amongst the weeds in their spring green lushness


The very new leaves of the white carpet rose.

The very new leaves of the white carpet rose.


White "mouse ears" or forget-me-not"

White “mouse ears” or forget-me-not”


One of the last Daffodils

One of the last Daffodils


Green minty freshness

Green minty freshness

Snow forecast.

This afternoon the weather people have issued a heavy snow warning for my part of New Zealand. They suggest the snow will fall overnight and tomorrow morning on hills at around 300 metres.
Will it happen? I don’t know. Snow falling here is a rare event but it has happened in the past. It is certainly bitterly cold here as we head into a second week of very low temperatures, biting winds and plenty of rain. Earlier predictions of a warm winter are a distant memory now.
However this magnolia bud about to burst forth is a result of the warmer conditions we enjoyed up until 10 days ago. It is a very early bud.
DSCF0156
This brave daffodil is more “on time” as they do flower earlier here than the date that officially marks spring.
DSCF0127
With snow forecast then this Edelweiss flowering in the garden is not looking so foreign right now.
DSCF0133
Wikipedia offers this: Edelweiss (English pronunciation i/ˈeɪdəlvaɪs/, from German [ˈeːdəlvaɪs]; systematic name Leontopodium alpinum or Leontopodium nivale ssp.), is a well-known mountain flower, belonging to the sunflower family.
The plant is unequally distributed and prefers rocky limestone places at about 1800–3000 m altitude. It is non toxic, and has been used traditionally in folk medicine as a remedy against abdominal and respiratory diseases. The dense hair appears to be an adaptation to high altitudes, protecting the plant from cold, aridity and ultraviolet radiation.[2] As a scarce short-lived flower found in remote mountain areas, the plant has been used as a symbol for alpinism, for rugged beauty and purity associated with the Alps, and as a national symbol especially of Austria and of Switzerland.

A host of golden daffodils……..of various tonings

Spring is showing itself here more dramatically with each passing day. I went down to the reserve near our local school and kindergarten today where there are thousands of daffodils planted. They are planted in the grass beneath a stand of flowering cherry trees.

I blogged about the cherry trees here and mentioned that this reserve is in honour of Porirua’s sister city relationship with Nishio city in Japan.

The wind was gusty so the daffodils were dancing and nodding. The trees above them are budding but have to yet to flower.

A variety of daffodil bulbs have been planted giving a varied show.

Across from the reserve was a weeping willow tree just putting out its first soft, tender, pretty green leaves in a hazy display.

A flowering fruit tree was bursting with blossom.

And further down the walkway was a small flowering tree with these delicate white blossoms showing.

Some sunshine on Saturday

The sun has been a rare visitor here for the past two or three weeks. We have also had a lot of rain. Some has fallen in dramatically heavy showers while other rain has sifted down as drizzle. The ground is waterlogged so gardening is not easy to do right now.

So any sun that appears right now is very, very welcome.

Nature has provided me with some different sunshine to bring inside and enjoy.

Sending you sunshine wherever you are.

Sopping wet

We have had two and a half days of continual rain. Our local weather website tells me that 51.7mm of rain has fallen in July to date. 20.2 mm fell yesterday.

The rain has been heavy at times but in the main it has been thick, heavy drizzle. The drizzle drops are as fine as pin pricks but soak things thoroughly and quickly. Around here we call it “very wetting rain”. It is impossible to run between the drops…:-))

Everything feels damp and the grass is sodden and best avoided. Paths have little streams draining over them or large puddles sitting on them.

When the rain eased a little this morning I went outdoors for some welcome fresh air and took some photos of drips which glistened everywhere in the calm conditions.

I also rescued the first daffodil from drowning. The daffodils are early this year but very welcome as we hope for some drying conditions very soon.

A walk to the cherry blossom trees

Yesterday I walked down to the stand of cherry blossom trees that was planted on city council reserve some years back in honour of our sister city Nishio, Japan. The display this year is breath-taking. Beneath these trees are millions of spring bulbs, which have almost finished flowering now but they were a picture a few weeks ago too.
Whoever thought of this initiative deserves to be acknowledged and thanked for the special pleasure this area brings.