Tag Archives: deciduous trees

The Japanese Maple tree’s magnificent colour display

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Three days went by between these photos and the ones I posted in my previous post.  The colours on the tree had intensified dramatically.  The tree had become a visual treat of autumn blaze with some of the lower branches still holding to green.  It is easy to sit and enjoy the display being played out in front of our eyes and to wonder at the exact factors which have influenced such drama.

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Autumn shows it hand.

We planted a Japanese maple in our garden almost 20 years ago and it offers delight during every season.  Spring and autumn are the most spectacular times for this tree to display its beauty.  We have not enjoyed settled weather at all this year until late April.  Since then we have had some splendid autumn weather and perhaps chilly nights, no wind and warm days account for the amazing colour display we have been enjoying.  Members of the household agree that this has been one of the very best displays we have seen on this tree.

These photos were taken on 25th April 2017 and show the branchlets turning fiery red but the leaves a mix of green and coloured.IMG_0186 (800x600)IMG_0188 (800x600)IMG_0190 (800x600)

Three days later I took some more photos.  Look out for these in my next post.

Slow, gentle autumn

Our incredible summer has given way to a slow, gentle and warm autumn with the occasional storm and chilly snap.

No matter the calmness and mild temperatures because the light is decreasing noticeably now and the shortest day is only a month or so away.
Lowering light levels and the cold of last weekend has seen leaf colour turn and the leaves beginning to fall in large numbers now.

On a short walk yesterday before the rain set in I captured these photos.

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The familiar Wellington Botanical Gardens

One of the first Tulips of spring 2012. It was named “Pinocchio”

Earlier this week we left home in warm, calm and sunny conditions and headed into the Wellington Botanical Gardens to view the very early spring flowering.

As can often be the case in our region the weather in the city was cold, heavily overcast and the wind was unpleasant. This meant our visit was shorter than planned.

However, weather aside, I really enjoyed returning to these very familiar Gardens and to a part of the Gardens that has changed very, very little in the 55 plus years that I have been visiting them.

Once my parents bought a car we would often head to the Gardens on a Sunday afternoon to hear the Highland Pipe Bands play and march at the Soundshell or on the grass in front of the Soundshell. My parents loved Pipe Band music and as small children we would march and move to the music or play around the grassy area.

Near this spot was a small fountain which has small concrete frogs around the edging. With any luck you could spray the water coming from their mouths in wide arcs across the fountain. Harmless, childish fun which can still be enjoyed today.

Further along a path is a duck pond where we fed the ducks and in that time honoured way children still do that today.

The tulip beds were full but only a few flowers were blooming. Spring festival with Tulip Sunday will happen later in September. But again this is a long time familiar event.

The aged trees – Magnolia and deciduous are all still there as are the fuchsias along the brick fence line. The difference I noted on this visit was the thickness of the epiphytes clothing the thick branches like sleeves of wearable art of some form.

The familiar can be very comforting in a world that changes so rapidly. It would appear that no one is in a hurry to redevelop this section of the Gardens and I like that.

Flowers on a Magnolia tree, appearing to float against the sky

Rhododendron

Flowering azalea

Are these yellow flowers crocus??

Epiphytes completely cover the huge boughs of this tree.

One of these things is not like the other…

Today after we had sung in our community choir concert we visited a park that has a stand of large trees. Many of the trees are non-indigenous, deciduous varieties but there are well established natives included too.

When our children were small we would come to this park during autumn and they would run and jump and play in the huge drifts of fallen, dry, crackling leaves. They loved it.

Many of the trees were already bare when we visited today but there were plenty of leaves still and a couple of large drifts that we could have jumped into or hidden someone beneath. We opted instead to take some photos.

I snapped a couple of shots of the largest pile of fallen leaves expecting that the photos would be fairly uninteresting.

It was not until I uploaded the photos and viewed them on my computer screen that I spotted the one green leaf poking out of the huge pile of brown leaves.

It reminded me of our uniqueness as individuals; of how, at times, I feel so very, very different from other people; of how one person can stand out dramatically from the crowd; of how when looking at the big picture we can miss the details; of how we all have something special to offer the world and we need to let this be seen.

The glowing colours of late autumn

Our largest flowering cherry tree is later to blossom and later to shed its leaves compared with the other two in our garden. But the frosty nights and colder days now, plus the decreasing number of daylight hours have meant we are offered this glowing, warming display right now.

Flowering cherry trees in their autumn tonings

Some years ago now a wonderful decision was made by our local city council. In recognition of Porirua’s Sister City relationship with Nishio City in Japan, a grove of flowering cherry trees was planted on grassy reserve land near our local school and kindergarten.

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This grove of trees brings such simple but profound pleasure to so many residents and visitors as the trees cycle through the seasons. Last spring the flowering was prolific and the lack of wind meant the blossoms were not ruined. In summer it is a shady, leafy spot for children to play or picnic under and for dogs to enjoy sniffing about on their daily walk.

Autumn brings a dramatic colour show with the trees now large and spreading. We have been enjoying, actually reveling in an Indian summer since Easter and the nights have not been crisp and cold in the main. This has meant the leaves on these trees have not had the stimulation that causes strong colour changes. However nature is at work right now despite our “false” summer and the trees are well worth visiting to enjoy their autumn splendour.

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With storm force winds predicted for yesterday and through the night we decided to head down to the grove to capture some photos before the leaves were stripped off by the gales.

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The wind proved to be very “Wellington”. So strong I had trouble opening my car door against it and to walk into the wind required a certain lean that all Wellingtonians get teased about. It was nevertheless invigorating as swirls of fallen leaves from the many deciduous trees in that spot flew up and around us.

Such a large expanse of varied colour was a challenge to capture on humble digital cameras from ground level but we did our best.

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After being buffeted and blown about we returned home feeling utterly refreshed and “our cobwebs” blown away.