Tag Archives: Pauatahanui Inlet

A walk by the water

Yesterday, the second half of the year began and with the weather pretending to be springlike we went for a stroll along the edge of the Pauatahanui Inlet. The light from the sun was golden, the air still in sheltered spots and the temperature surprisingly mild.

Birdlife was abundant and active, although a low tide meant photographs were tricky to take, even with a zoom.

The White faced Heron was happy to show its elegant footwork once we sat down and were quiet. It appeared to have plenty of food on offer in the shallows.

DSCF2739

DSCF2740

DSCF2741

This spot is a favourite for the local Kingfisher population and there were plenty about. They like to sit in the trees, scope out their next meal (mostly small mud crabs) and dive swiftly to catch it.

DSCF2742

This one was more than happy to sit on a rock and look about. It looks very well fed!  Camera gear and equipment needs to be much more elaborate than mine to get good photographs of these zippy, beautiful birds.

These flowers (Kniphofia) displayed winter warmth.

DSCF2746

Our stroll took us past Toe Toe, which always respond to any breeze or wind blowing and can look very stream-lined and active.

DSCF2744

Then past this tree having shed its leaves but glowing with life still. ( The strength of the prevailing wind can be seen in its shape – we really do have tree-bendy winds here)

DSCF2745

And the light on the water was magical.

DSCF2750

The Peace of Wild Things – a poem by Wendell Berry

The Peace of Wild Things

By Wendell Berry

When despair for the world grows in me

and I wake in the night at the least sound

in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,

I go and lie down where the wood drake

rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.

I come into the peace of wild things

who do not tax their lives with forethought

of grief. I come into the presence of still water.

And I feel above me the day-blind stars

waiting with their light. For a time

I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.

Wendell Berry, “The Peace of Wild Things” from The Selected Poems of Wendell Berry. Copyright © 1998. Published and reprinted by arrangement with Counterpoint Press.

Source: Collected Poems 1957-1982 (Counterpoint Press, 1985)

I followed the wise words of Wendell Berry and went to Pauatahanui today.

By the Inlet I found a Heron feeding….

DSCF2508 (1280x934)

DSCF2507 (1280x904)

And not a wood drake but a solitary Black Swan.

DSCF2520 (1280x960)

The Wild Things were calm and untaxed.

DSCF2501 (1280x960)

DSCF2496 (1280x703)

The water still and beautiful.

DSCF2522 (1280x960)

It was easy to breathe and calm and feel restored.

Vantage points

Summer has hit here with a capital “S”! Temperatures have been high and being out in the blazing sun for too long is not advisable. Sun hats, sun block, covering up, seeking shade and plenty of fluid is the order of the day.

The sky has been a deep, clear blue for days on end without a cloud in sight.

Yesterday an errand took me near this vantage point and I thought I would share some photos of the Porirua Harbour and views over Porirua.
DSCF2183 (1280x960)

Mana marina, Porirua

Mana marina, Porirua


The entrance to Porirua Harbour and the Pauatahanui Inlet.  Mana Marina to the right of the photo.

The entrance to Porirua Harbour and the Pauatahanui Inlet. Mana Marina to the right of the photo.


The flat top of Mana Island on the horizon, beyond Whitireia Park and Onepoto, Porirua

The flat top of Mana Island on the horizon, beyond Whitireia Park and Onepoto, Porirua


The view across Onepoto to the hills of the South Island looking blue in the heat haze.

The view across Onepoto to the hills of the South Island looking blue in the heat haze.


Across Porirua Harbour to Elsdon and Takapuwahia, Porirua

Across Porirua Harbour to Elsdon and Takapuwahia, Porirua


A section of Porirua City

A section of Porirua City


The steep, parched hills beyond Porirua city.  The highest point is known as Colonial Knob.  It is a muscle stretching climb to that point.

The steep, parched hills beyond Porirua city. The highest point is known as Colonial Knob. It is a muscle stretching climb to that point.

A local resident was using his vantage point to fly the Union Jack.
DSCF2191 (1280x961)
And finally this Black Backed Gull decided to use this vantage point near me!
DSCF2180 (1280x1050)

Random beauty from the week

An antidote to news and events in the world that disturb and confuse. Here are my photos of the week.

DSCF1623 (800x600)

DSCF1691 (800x600)

Storm front moves in over Colonial Knob, Porirua

Storm front moves in over Colonial Knob, Porirua

DSCF1685 (800x600)

view from The Lookout, Whitby over Pauatahanui Inlet and out to the Tasman Sea.

view from The Lookout, Whitby over Pauatahanui Inlet and out to the Tasman Sea.

At the end of the day

The day here has been glorious. Warm, sunny, and only a slight breeze blowing. The light called me out after dinner and we headed to Motukaraka Point on the other side of the Pauatahanui Inlet.

Here are some light photos that drew my eye.
DSCF1076 (640x480)
DSCF1077 (640x480)
DSCF1080 (640x480)
DSCF1081 (640x480)
DSCF1083 (640x480)
DSCF1086 (640x480)

We also stopped and watched wild rabbits feeding on the lush spring grass and enjoyed two lively Kakariki….no photos of those yet on my camera but here is one from the NZ Birds online website.
redcrowned parakeet or Kakariki

Sometimes……

Sometimes when you live with a flock and have responsibilities to fly Point, or to wheel back and encourage everyone else from out on the wing, you need to take time out.

Then just float, allowing the surprising warmth of the spring sunshine to soak into you deeply, to find a still spot, a quiet spot to reflect and rest.
DSCF1003

Drift along a little when you feel ready and perhaps move gently in pleasant surroundings, gathering energy, filling your reserves.
DSCF1004
Simply watching the ripples, the reflections and the play of light on water.
DSCF1005

Eyes, cameras, explanations

Matthew Johnstone asks this in his calming book “Capturing Mindfulness – a guide to becoming present through photography.”
“What grabs you visually that you can’t fully explain?”

This photo that I took on Saturday, from a high vantage point above the Pauatahanui Inlet has the potential I discovered for some observers to wonder aloud about what they are seeing in the image.
DSCF0192
When I was allowing my eyes to wander on Saturday there was something about the kowhai tree that grabbed me. When I loaded the photo up on to the computer I thought I could easily explain what I had seen with my eyes and what the camera had recorded.

But another person offered a different explanation of the image and suddenly I saw a whole new utterly intriguing and evocative possibility.

Matthew Johnstone speaks of being “photopresent” and in the main, this is exactly how I approach going about with my camera. I allow my eye and sometimes my heart to notice and for the action of clicking the shutter to flow from that space. It is a restful, easy space that has that soothing quality of flow most of the time.

The end result is an image which can occasionally have an inexplicable quality to it offering further contemplation and I really like that.

As a postscript: Matthew Johnstone has written the “Black Dog” series and “Quiet the Mind, Capturing Mindfulness”. He has a website here: