Tag Archives: Toya Heatley

Finally I have noticed these……

I must have walked past this sign endless numbers of times as I’ve walked along the beachfront at Karehana Bay.
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I may have commented on the sign and the endangered birds shown but it was not until I saw these stunning photos taken by Toya Heatley that I set off with some determination (and hope) to see these delightful birds for myself. (Thinornis novaeseelandiae) or native tuturuatu. Such a pretty Maori name.

After I had eaten my frog for the day (that is: done the tough chore of the day) I went for a quiet walk around Aotea Lagoon where I spotted these delights.
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I then journeyed the short distance to the Plimmerton Fire Station where these special birds can frequently be seen foraging on the rocky point that forms the southern boundary of Karehana Bay. Rumour has it that this small group of 5 Shore Plovers are to be captured by Dept of Conservation staff and rehomed in a safe environment where they will hopefully breed and boost flagging numbers.
A fairly boisterous wind was blowing, it was cold and the tide was very high with breakers rolling in to the beach. Bracing was the word.
Despite my searching I could not find the birds. Another woman arrived and we discovered that we were both seeking the Shore Plovers. She is a local resident and knew quite a bit about these small, colourful and uniquely marked birds. Their Friar Tuck “hair line” gives the impression of a halo. I imagined a bird about the size of a tern but my companion told me they are bigger than a sparrow, perhaps about the size of a starling.
We went around the back of the Fire Station and along where the Plovers are often seen but no joy. We went further along to another sandy strip of beach but nothing. It was feeling disheartening and we wondered if the birds had already been captured.
Another search near the Fire Station proved fruitless. The other woman had to leave and I decided to try once more along the beach before returning to my car. No joy. Something urged me to go back to the sheltered side of the Fire Station just one last time and perhaps speak to the woman who had been gathering seaweed for her garden to see if she had seen the birds.
As if by magic there were the Shore Plovers foraging in a group of 5.
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The woman gathering seaweed was delighted to spot them too and we watched enchanted as the small group moved along the sand or amongst the rocks and rock pools feeding.
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I followed the wee flock and took some photos of these shy birds. At one point one of the birds flew into the air singing a pretty squeaking little song as it wheeled about and rejoined the others.
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I was thrilled to have seen these special birds and to have some of my own photos of them. Sometimes we think we are paying attention and seeing all that is around us but this experience has reminded me that it is easy to overlook something very special.

When you wish upon a star

The lyrics of this well-known song date back to the 1940s for the film adaptation of “Pinocchio” and begin…….
”When you wish upon a star
Makes no difference who you are
Anything your heart desires will come to you”

By Ned Washington, Leigh Harline.

Here are the emerging, delicate white star flowers on the garlic chives. They look good enough to make a wish on.
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My wishes for more native birds appearing in my garden have continued to come true this week. Another slight thud on a window heralded the sight of another (or the same) Shining Cuckoo that I blogged about here.
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This time the wee bird was ready to fly away very quickly. These Cuckoos migrate in autumn to various Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia and the Solomon’s. The navigation skills they possess to achieve that journey are impressive. Their ability to avoid window panes in New Zealand is not so good.

Earlier today I heard a bird noise that sounded foreign to me. It was a high pitched squeaking sound that was rather persistent. Then late this afternoon the sound was much closer and I discovered a mature Tui and its very newly fledged youngster in the Tulip Magnolia near the sugar water feeder.

By the time I came outside with the camera the birds had flown. However the insistent squeaking noise was not far away and I found the fledgling again in the Mahoe tree in the tall tree area of our garden.

It is a splash of light near the throat of this young bird not its wattles.

It is a splash of light near the throat of this young bird not its wattles.

The parent bird flew off as I crept closer but my eye was caught by another fledgling bumbling about in the variegated Griselinia.
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It would seem that the adult birds have bought their twins to my garden to feast on the Mahoe berries and with the sugar feeder not far away. Or better still they have nested here and raised these young.
It is almost impossible to gain clear images as the wee birds wisely remain amongst the thick foliage up high in the trees. Neither of these fledglings have wattles and their yellow edged beaks were still visible to my eye as they moved about the branches. Their agility has yet to develop and some of their feathers had a downy look still. They are very newly out of the nest.
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And in further exciting bird news please link here to Toya’s blog where she has posted about her amazing successes at Zealandia over the past two days. Her photos of the Stitchbirds and today the Eastern Rosella feeding its four hungry babies are simply stunning and very informative and special.